POINT OF VIEW

A moving screen.

When I, as Kris Allis, decided to write my first novel, I had to choose a point of view. Simply put, a point of view refers to who is telling the story. I decided to use the third person. And there the struggle began. There are four different roles in third person. When we converse and describe something the three roles are: he, she, they, and it. In writing the four roles are: the author, the narrator, the viewpoint character, and the protagonist. That’s enough to discourage anyone, no matter how strong the urge to write a novel, be it suspense thriller or mystery. Taking time to distinguish the difference is the best thing an aspiring novel writer can do. Everyone knows that the author(Kris Allis) is the one who writes the words and the person whose name appears on the cover of a suspense-thriller novel like “A Moving Screen.” But who is the narrator? Kris Allis, the author, is also the narrator because the narrator tells the story.

The difference between author and narrator is as follows:

Kris Allis is a living, breathing person who makes up the events and writes the story.

The narrator is a god-like person who looks down and describes everything to the reader.

Confusing is putting it mildly. But if an author uses the third person effectively the reader forgets about the author and relies on the narrator who has seen every event as if they really happened.

The main character or protagonist of the novels written by Lee Childs is a man called Jack Reacher. When Kris Allis reads about Jack Reacher she believes that he is real and that he has this extraordinary personality. That he has these adventures. And yet, Jack Reacher is a character made up or created by author Lee Childs.

In “A Moving Screen,” the protagonists are Merlot Candy and Dennis Cane. Two characters created by Kris Allis. And yet, a reader will actually believe that these two detectives are in hot pursuit of a serial killer.

A moving screen

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